St. Luke’s Anglican Church is a “Three Streams, One River” church

The Evangelical stream. This stream emphasizes the supreme authority of the Holy Scriptures in faith and life, and the necessity of both personal conversion and biblical discipleship. We share this stream’s belief in the centrality of the Cross, Christ’s atoning death as a substitution for us, and the truth of salvation by grace alone through faith alone in Christ alone. We also share its emphasis on the urgency of evangelism and mission here and abroad. For more on the reformed stream in classic Anglicanism, see the doctrinal statements in the 39 Articles of Religion. Some of our fathers in this stream include Martin Luther, Willliam Wilberforce, Bishop J.C. Ryle, J.I. Packer, and John Stott. This stream stresses the saving work of Jesus Christ, our Redeemer and Lord.

The Charismatic stream. This stream emphasizes the present work of The Holy Spirit in miraculous power in the life of the believer and the Church. It upholds the role of every believer as a minister who serves with one or more spiritual gifts, including healing, prophecy, and tongues, all for the building up of the church. The Holy Spirit enables us to hear His voice, to walk our talk, and abide in His love. Some of our guides in this stream include John Wesley, Dennis Bennett, John Wimber, Francis MacNutt, and Leanne Payne. This stream stresses the immanence of The Holy Spirit, our Sanctifier and Empowerer.

The Sacramental stream. This stream emphasizes the role of the sacraments of Baptism and Holy Eucharist, and the traditional orders of ordained ministry, in mediating the grace of God. It recognizes that the Holy Spirit has been at work in the church for 2000 years, including in the seven ecumenical councils, and He has given us a deposit of orthodox faith for our benefit and learning. Some of our fathers in this stream include Augustine of Hippo, Francis of Assisi, Richard Hooker, and C.S. Lewis. This steam stresses the transcendence of God, our Father and Creator.

St. Luke the Healer Anglican Church is a “Three Streams, One River” church.

Each stream focuses on one person of the Trinity. We own, recognize the value of, and practice three great streams of Christianity, which flow together into a mighty river of faith: 1. The Evangelical stream. This stream emphasizes the supreme authority of the Holy Scriptures in faith and life, and the necessity of both personal conversion and biblical discipleship. We share this stream’s belief in the centrality of the Cross, Christ’s atoning death as a substitution for us, and the truth of salvation by grace alone through faith alone in Christ alone. We also share its emphasis on the urgency of evangelism and mission here and abroad. For more on the reformed stream in classic Anglicanism, see the doctrinal statements in the 39 Articles of Religion. Some of our fathers in this stream include Martin Luther, Willliam Wilberforce, Bishop J.C. Ryle, J.I. Packer, and John Stott. This stream stresses the saving work of Jesus Christ, our Redeemer and Lord. 2. The Charismatic stream. This stream emphasizes the present work of The Holy Spirit in miraculous power in the life of the believer and the Church. It upholds the role of every believer as a minister who serves with one or more spiritual gifts, including healing, prophecy, and tongues, all for the building up of the church. The Holy Spirit enables us to hear His voice, to walk our talk, and abide in His love. Some of our guides in this stream include John Wesley, Dennis Bennett, John Wimber, Francis MacNutt, and Leanne Payne. This stream stresses the immanence of The Holy Spirit, our Sanctifier and Empowerer. 3. The Sacramental stream. This stream emphasizes the role of the sacraments of Baptism and Holy Eucharist, and the traditional orders of ordained ministry, in mediating the grace of God. It recognizes that the Holy Spirit has been at work in the church for 2000 years, including in the seven ecumenical councils, and He has given us a deposit of orthodox faith for our benefit and learning. Some of our fathers in this stream include Augustine of Hippo, Francis of Assisi, Richard Hooker, and C.S. Lewis. This steam stresses the transcendence of God, our Father and Creator.

Basic Beliefs

As a member of the Anglican Church in North America (ACNA), and the Anglican Diocese of the Great Lakes St. Luke’s Anglican Church upholds the ACNA Theological Statement, which outlines our core beliefs and commitments. We believe and confess Jesus Christ to be the Way, the Truth, and the Life: no one comes to the Father but by Him. Therefore, the Anglican Church in North America identifies the following seven elements as characteristic of the Anglican Way, and essential for membership: We confess the canonical books of the Old and New Testaments to be the inspired Word of God, containing all things necessary for salvation, and to be the final authority and unchangeable standard for Christian faith and life. We confess Baptism and the Supper of the Lord to be Sacraments ordained by Christ Himself in the Gospel, and thus to be ministered with unfailing use of His words of institution and of the elements ordained by Him. We confess the godly historic Episcopate as an inherent part of the apostolic faith and practice, and therefore as integral to the fullness and unity of the Body of Christ. We confess as proved by most certain warrants of Holy Scripture the historic faith of the undivided church as declared in the three Catholic Creeds: the Apostles’, the Nicene, and the Athanasian. Concerning the seven Councils of the undivided Church, we affirm the teaching of the first four Councils and the Christological clarifications of the fifth, sixth and seventh Councils, in so far as they are agreeable to the Holy Scriptures. We receive The Book of Common Prayer as set forth by the Church of England in 1662, together with the Ordinal attached to the same, as a standard for Anglican doctrine and discipline, and, with the Books which preceded it, as the standard for the Anglican tradition of worship. We receive the Thirty-Nine Articles of Religion of 1562, taken in their literal and grammatical sense, as expressing the Anglican response to certain doctrinal issues controverted at that time, and as expressing the fundamental principles of authentic Anglican belief.